I love to read mysteries. I used to think of mysteries as the book equivalent of candy corn, my special treat which gave me a rush but not one which necessarily was feeding my brain. …

I love to read mysteries. I used to think of mysteries as the book equivalent of candy corn, my special treat which gave me a rush but not one which necessarily was feeding my brain. …

The American Revolution was not brought about by a mob. In fact, in the eleven years leading up to the Declaration of Independence, American colonists largely relied upon peaceful means to oppose the tyrannical and oppressive actions of the King and Parliament. They successfully used economic boycotts to effect policy changes, as well as other legal measures (including an impeachment process in an effort to remove a Chief Justice beholden to the King).

In addition, both patriots and loyalists repeatedly sought to reconcile with the King, intent on settling peacefully their differences over colonial governing — but they were rebuffed…

The fight for independence in the 1770s was in large part motivated by the struggle between colonists on one side and the King and Parliament on the other side, to control the justice system in the colonies. The very first case for impeachment in America was brought in 1774, against Peter Oliver, the Chief Justice of Massachusetts. John Adams prepared the Articles of Impeachment, which listed corruption, greed, and disloyalty, all indicative of “high crimes and misdemeanors,” as the bases for impeachment.

At issue was the question of allegiance: for whom did Oliver speak, the colonists or the Crown? Because…

The fight for independence in the 1770s was in large part motivated by the colonists’ disgust with how the King and Parliament sought to manipulate colonial judges, and in turn, the King and Parliament understood just how important it was to have power over the judges and the judicial system, which is why they instigated the methods for controlling the courts which so riled up the colonists. The very first case for impeachment in America was brought in 1774, instigated by Massachusetts’ House of Representatives against Peter Oliver, the Chief Justice of Massachusetts. …

Yes, the Founding Fathers caved on slavery. The concession to certain southern colonies on the issue of slavery was made primarily to keep those colonies from jumping ship on declaring war against England. Because those southern leaders depended on slavery to keep their economies going, they wanted it preserved.

Thomas Jefferson’s original Declaration of Independence included a paragraph condemning slavery as a “cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people…captivating & carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere or to incur miserable death in their transportation…

On February 22, 1770, Christopher Seider, an eleven-year old boy, was shot and killed on the streets of Boston by Ebenezer Richardson, a former informer for the Royal Customs Office. Richardson had come to the aid of a neighbor being harassed by a group of young boys for selling imported British goods. The boys chased Richardson back to his own house and from the attic windows, he shot down into the crowd, killing Seider.

John Adams attended the huge funeral which Sam Adams and his Sons of Liberty planned for Seider. Despite the snow, hail, thunder, and lightning that tormented…

Americans carrying assault weapons into public spaces, whether it is to intimidate or “to protect,” are not patriots. Armed to the teeth, they support shop owners defying government mandates; they threaten Governor Whitmer of Michigan; they storm state capitols — all in the name of their freedom as Americans. But they have nothing in common with the American rebels who fought for independence from the England.

The fight for independence grew out of colonial frustration with England’s sudden interference with colonial economic and social activity in the 1760s. For decades the colonies had been largely ignored, other than for what…

Please read this story at here.

Americans carrying assault weapons into public spaces, whether it is to intimidate or “to protect,” are not patriots. Armed to the teeth, they support…

Three years ago, while browsing through the collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, I came across a captivating book by a man named Daniel Munro Wilson.

Daniel Munro Wilson

Daniel Munro Wilson was a late 19th/early 20th century minister and historian who published a number of historical works in his lifetime. Born in Scotland, he moved with his parents to Massachusetts in the mid-1800s. In 1873, he graduated from the Harvard Divinity School after a brief career as a journalist. In the late 1800s, he served as minister of the First Church of Braintree, formerly the North Parish Church of Braintree.

The North…

Nina Sankovitch

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